Sunday, July 16, 2017

Breaking Ground on the New Barn


The new barn will sit approximately where the
big white dog is strolling
Finally, we broke ground yesterday and four post holes were dug for the new barn. We are thrilled. Rain, work schedules, sorting through all the broken pieces of the barn and the search for a hefty post hole digger (THANK YOU Mare and John!) delayed the start of our biggest project on the Poor Farm. But, we're on our way.

After taking count of the good and bad pieces we estimate we have enough good material to build the walls of a 40 by 51 foot barn. Due to the destruction of the roof steel and trusses, when the building was dismantled, we'll be purchasing all of those components.

The county inspector came out last week and gave us the thumbs up on the size and location of the new structure. Keith then leveled out the north side of the building site and deposited the soil around our little well house, which has needed fill since it was revised last year. He also scooped up the area where our three steer had their winter shelter, and deposited that well rotted manure and straw, into our compost bin. Three birds, one stone.





We then measured and re-measured and measured again,  the location of all the posts, marking them with flags.


Attaching the post hole digger to our Kubota tractor took some time and a phone call to the fellow loaning it to us, but once attached, it worked like a huge metal charm on the end of a PTO shaft.









Until we hit brick.
I'm telling you, the people who owned this farm before us loved to bury garbage here, there, and everywhere. Fortunately it was only six bricks and...a fork.




Apparently they also liked to have picnics at their dump sites.

22 comments:

  1. The preparation for a job is often the longest bit!. I have a neighbour who is starting a type of holiday village. He is burying 10 huge shipping containers underground. He is buying them ready converted, all he has to do is bury them, and attach the pipes and wires. It all sounds like a lot of fun; I'll take pictures when they arrive.

    I was pleased to hear that your inspector approved. Great hole digger!

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    1. Now those I'd love to see! Here you can buy a plain shipping container for about $1600. We considered living in one while building our grain bin house but chose the $500 camper instead. Do post lost of pics on your blog about his progress too.

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  2. Glad to read that the barn project is getting underway, Donna. It's unfortunate that the roof and trusses have to be repurchased, but good news on salvaging other parts.

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    1. It will all work out...or we'll have steers sleeping with us this winter.

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  3. There's something very satisfying when you first break ground for a new project. I hope it all goes smoothly for you both.

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    1. Starting a big project is indeed as much fun as finishing one, it's the time in the middle that rings rather dull.

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  4. Oh gosh Donna...that fork and brick photo is a good one...and the hole digger. I want one! :) I'm glad your county is being good with you and you can make some progress! That's quite an undertaking!!!

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    1. We are not bright enough-ever-to take the easy way out Rain. Always some project going on!

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    2. LOL...I think it's the opposite, you're TOO bright to take the easy way out! :)

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  5. Well done on progress so far.....onward.....'don't let the turkeys get you down'.
    I think I would call in all favours to get lots done asap, Winter this way comes and time flies by when you need something finished by a deadline.
    Farting cattle in the silo will be a fire hazard!

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    1. "Farting cattle in the Silo"...another great rock band name.

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  6. Always great news when the inspector approves :)
    It's going to be a grand barn !
    When our house was built, they buried all of their rubbish, we are still finding junk.
    Can't wait to see the progress.
    ~Jo

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    1. I just wish we could uncover something of value! A bit of silver, a smidge of gold, an inkling of copper...

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  7. It's always great to see progress. I'm glad you've both settled on some decisions. Can't wait to see more.

    Our new neighbours, did some earthworks, to put their new shed/garage in, recently too. So there's a big flat landing, similar to what you have. I'm sure once the concrete pad goes down, it will go up in short order. He's an electrician, so was able to do his own electrical work.

    I'm not used to seeing so much progress! We're such snails in comparison, lol. ;)

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    1. Our progress is definitely snail like here as well. Rain then terrible heat, coupled with Keith's off farm work, but every day we get a bit more down. We're praying for a very long and mild fall!

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  8. We're going to be digging out here soon for a new calf shed, all going well. Wonder what we'll find once we get rid of all the old tree roots.

    Amused by the fork - wonder if they spent long looking for it.

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    1. The fork, like all the other junk found here, was never missed by pervious owners. Just once I'd like to dig up something of value!

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  9. This is exciting news! Congratulations on the start. Sounds like it's going to be truly impressive! Hopefully your archaeological finds will limit itself to not too much trash.

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    1. The pop and bear cans are the worse! We find them, collect them, get rid of them and they just keep working their way through the soil. That and old bedsprings!

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    2. Actually it's BEER cans not bear cans. My kingdom for an editor!

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