Friday, August 10, 2018

And Then, The Well Ran Dry




It's always something Gilda.
I miss Gilda Radner don't you? Her character Lisa Loopner was my fave.


But I regress, back to The Poor Farm.

Rain is now a distant memory. Storms have been hit and miss here in Central Illinois. Farms just fifteen miles south of us get three inches one day while we get only moody skies. Each week Inaccuweather tells us of T-storms on the way. Liars. Often we can see rain pouring over fields nearby, and yet we are ignored.

Last week, late one afternoon, the water pressure in the Looney Bin suddenly dropped and sure enough, our well was dry. It happened once last summer but it was due to one of us leaving a hose running too long somewhere. It may have been me but fortunately the hippie-homesteader cam was not working, so no proof.

Last week, I had done a couple loads of laundry and watered the garden which was too much apparently for our shallow 100 foot well. Originally dug in 1868, before washing machines and other indoor plumbing luxuries like showers, it succumbed to our 21st century use.

We shut the well pump off and waited, worried, but with a few hours we had water again. Thus, we are on self-imposed water restrictions. No garden watering other than what I carry out to my potted flowers from the sink in the form of leftover dish water.

Laundry is done in two day cycles. On day one I wash a load, shut it off and on day two I run it through the rinse cycle.  Showers are short and sweet and I rinse my dishes very quickly. A little Dawn left on plate surfaces won't kill us.

I must continue canning in order to preserve what has tolerated the dry heat, tomatoes, beans, peppers and cabbage for kraut, which takes water as well, so I usually can on days I am not running the washing machine.

Last year our daughter gave us a rain barrel which unfortunately we have not yet set up to collect water from our new barn roof. I'm certainly regretting that now as would have been a great source of extra water for some of my garden. Oh well. Without making mistakes how does one ever learn?

Our priority is water for the livestock. Milk cow Liz above, waits patiently for her share.

Come On Rain !!!!!

22 comments:

  1. Ooh dear, My daughter has a well, but fortunately she also has a public water supply, so she doesn't rely on it other than for the livestock and garden.
    It rained here yesterday, I can't tell you how badly we needed it.
    Hoping you get that much needed rainfall, forget the clothes washing, just take care of Liz's needs for now :)
    Hugs,
    ~Jo

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    1. Fortunately for me, I work at home and what I wear matters little. Keith does go to a job everyday so he warrants some clean smelling items. Glad you got rain!!

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  2. Oh man, what bad luck :(
    It's funny to me how the weather you are having always mirrors us here in north western Pennsylvania. We are in bad need of rain here too, the grass is brown and even the weeds are starting to droop. For canning can't you reuse the same "bath" of water for each batch? I mean it isn't in contact with your food and it's coming to a boil anyway? I've been doing this all week and we haven't died yet.

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    1. Yes, I do that as well, but some items like beans need fresh water added and then there is the clean up. Water, we take it for granted until it's in limited supply. Kinda like electricity and gas and Jameson.

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  3. I pray for no repeat of the dust ball years.

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    1. My grandparents were deeply affected by the depression which affected my parents. Thus I did learn how to conserve and save and waste less. We are due for rain tonight and if it happens I plan to sleep outside on the lawn in the midst of the storm. :)

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  4. I just found your blog. Great! I am also returning to the farm rural lifestyle of my youth. Boy the learning curve is steep! Our well stopped too, but luckily it was the bladder, an easy fix.
    Stop on by my blog and lets get acquainted!

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  5. That's a pain. And you're sure it's your water supply, not your pump? We replaced a pump once, and faulty wiring as well. We've also had pressure tank issues. Our well is about 100 feet deep and thankfully the water supply itself has always held up. I really hope you get some decent rain soon. -Jenn

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    1. Our pump was new a couple of years ago and now that the well has refilled, its running great. For us its the issue of needing water for the livestock who drink large amounts. Since we've cut back on laundry and garden watering the well is keeping up. Rain due tonight!

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  6. We had a tiny bit a couple of days ago, and are promised a tiny bit more next week. Everything is so dry here, I always fear turning on our tap, and finding it empty. My fingers are crossed.

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    1. Keep them crossed, a dry tap is no fun. Is your wine supply up to snuff? Fluids are good in any form

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  7. Oh wow, I had no idea it was that dry in those parts. I'll run around at the farm and do a nekkid rain dance if it will help. Of course, the neighbors cows on the other hand may be traumatized. ha.

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    1. Yes please. I nekkid rain dance would be appreciated. I did one the other nights but apparently only ticked off the rain gods. It's drier than ever. (I dance like Elaine on Sienfeld)

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  8. Maybe if we all did a collective rain dance it would help, Donna. We had a well when we lived in VA and were always concerned about it holding up, but it did. Recently, we heard that the new homeowner had to have a new one put in. Sounds like you have quite a plan going to conserve and hopefully rain will come your way soon.

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    1. Wow! Another rain dance volunteer. I'm in!

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  9. we have had the same experience here. just east of here, they've had so much rain they are complaining. it keeps missing us. but we get the humidity which has been just awful.

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    1. Oh man, humidity is the devil. Been so dry here we've not even seeing much dew in the morning. A least humidity gives one the hope of precipitation.

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  11. NOT here in Central Pennsylvania, it has been raining most of the month and it's only August 13. We have soy beans fields flooded, Straw that never got baled, our potatoes and tomatoes have drowned and the mosquitoes are blood thirsty.
    Really wish we could help you out.
    AH, no climate change!

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  12. Sorry about your well, but feel your pain. However, our problem is completely opposite of yours, we run out of water when it rains, our place is a "geographical oddity" as we like to call it. Makes no sense and we can't figure it out ourselves. After about 3-4 hours, it comes back on but there is mud in the sediment filter. We clean it out and everything is fine until it rains again. Geographical oddity.

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  13. What a bummer. We've had those dry summers in recent years and have experienced running out of water too. Not the kind of excitement anyone wants! This year I thought we were all prepared with 2500 gallons of rainwater collected, only to have one of the rainiest summers I recall. But next year may be different. Who knows?

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