Friday, August 21, 2015

Here Comes The Joist.








 Lots of floor joists, all reclaimed wood, all 2 by 8's technically but measuring in at 2 by 7 and 15/16 or 2 by 7 and 5/8 etc...This makes for creative work when positioning them on top the beam as future floor support and causes us to wonder existentially : just how screwed up will the final floor be? Will we be able to set a chair at one end and watch it rush to the other side Poltergeist fashion?


Image result for poltergeist chair scene
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Rr3bsEXp6I
That Mary Beth is some cheerleader isn't she? Been a few years (decades) since I could do splits mid air like that.

Back to boards. Like the beam and posts we purchased the floor joists from our neighbor who deconstructs old barns and resells the wood. These joists came from various buildings and match only in the fact that they are all old. A variety of wood types, all have nail holes, gauges, faded spots, stained areas, chalk, ink and pen marks. A few were even grave markers I believe but why ask? To prepare them for center stage I ran a wire brush over them to remove the most caked on debri and then coated with polyurethane. Even dried on chicken manure glows with a little polyurethane I've noted.

This made some of the boards absolutely gorgeous while some took on just a dirty shiny look. The worst looking will support the floor above our bathroom as they won't be seen while those who made the cut-literally-will be seen from our main first floor living space. It took a good amount of time to measure for this project as with the curve of our building no joist was the same exact length or width. Overlap at the main beam area will be cut back and evened up.

Along the inside wall, additional boards were cut and secured in between each joist and discussion was had regarding do we keep these cross boards exposed as well or cover with drywall? Knowing we will do the drywall ourselves, a task we have yet to learn, we decided to keep these smaller cross boards exposed; that way less drywall cutting and pasting. Besides if people are focused on the fact that these cross boards don't match they'll be less likely to notice our shabby drywall techniques.


PS. I apologize for the quality of the last two pictures at the beginning of this post. Blogger for some insane reason will not let me remove them. or perhaps it's just because they are positioned so close to the Poltergeist clip. They do have some weird lighting in them don't they?






8 comments:

  1. It certainly looking sturdy. The odd beams give character and will a talking point in the years ahead.

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    1. Yes sturdy, I've always wanted a castle but so out of the budget so will do a mini-fortress.

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  2. My Lord, Donna - fortress is right. Centuries to come, when the metal walls are rust in the wind and we are dust in the ground, those beams will still stand, confounding archeologists and future building inspectors for decades. The beam circle will become the American 'woodhenge'. Make sure you carve some names and/or dates in them - and maybe a couple of 'space symbols' to really give them something to think about. Looking good....

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    1. You crack me up Kris..."woodhenge" Love it!

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    2. Actually there is a Woodhenge in England, discovered adjacent to and part of the huge complex that is Stonehenge. No space symbols there, though. *snicker*

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  3. The joists/beams are gorgeous. I love the rustic look and feel. Such a unique home you will have!

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  4. I've just been catching up on your adventures, and I have to say (although I was sad to say goodbye to the Midlife Farmwife), you do not disappoint! You continue to have fascinating adventures, and your sense of humor still shines through even when you're roughing it! I love to see the GBH taking shape. Thanks for all the detailed posts.

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  5. Love your blog. It is great to see a GBH in progess. We are planning on building in the next year. I see that you showed the windows being framed. Can you tell us how you are cutting the windows out of the grain bin and then the windows you are using? How are you sealing the windows?

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