Wednesday, October 12, 2016

The Relocation of The Farm Store






 As we continue to clean up and divide out the farm in Chatsworth, we have been faced with many decisions about what to keep, what to sell, what to store, ad infinitum. One decision made; to move the building we used as our retail farm store for nearly seven years, up to The Poor Farm. The picture above was taken just minutes before it's departure.

Countryside Barns of Eureka, Illinois originally built the structure for us and then moved it to Chatsworth back in 2010. It was through the generosity of one of our customers (who offered to loan us the money for it) that we were able to have a farm store at all.  We all benefited. They invested in a small farmer with a modest return in interest, while we were able to sell our products from a safe and secure building, rather than out of our basement freezers as we had been doing.

The building measures 12 by 24 foot and was solidly constructed, so moving it yesterday went well One young fellow (Ernie) arrived with a big truck and the coolest piece of equipment called "The Mule". This device allowed capable Ernie to maneuver the building easily onto the trailer.





 Fifteen  miles later, with me leading the way flashers going and all, (I felt so official) we arrived at The Poor Farm where Ernie unloaded it from the trailer and then maneuvered it up our very narrow drive. Quite a difference from the wide open and flat areas of our Chatsworth farm.

Once the building was turned up the drive, the task became tricky as the young man had to maneuver between electric fence lines and several metal posts.



Finally up the drive he had to motor it over the ups and downs of our very unlevel land. leading to the buildings final parking spot. At one point I thought it would tip over for sure!



But that Ernie, he maintained complete control and backed the building down the hill, nestling it in the same area we parked our Shasta camper last year which is near center of our property and several hundred yards from our grain bin house.


Welcome to your new home old farm store now turned guest house/writers retreat. Wait until you see the remodeling plans I have for your insides. Gonna gut you baby and dress you up like an old  library I am. If anyone has a weathered leather club chair, preferably the one Dylan Thomas sat in, please send it my way.

25 comments:

  1. A great decision to make, when you're so low on space. As a fellow creative, I know how important it is to have that dedicated space. It doesn't obstruct with anyone else's plans or activities, and you don't have to constantly move stuff you're working on.

    But more than that, it's not just a building, it has memories and history to go along with it. And now you get to make new ones. I'm really happy for you. :)

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    1. It's weired isn't it? I can sit in a room of strangers-in a cafe say- and have no problems writing but at home, hearing my husband come in and out (he's very good about no disturbing me) is still so distracting. I'm just a big pain in the ass.

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  2. it will be a wonderful hideaway, lucky you!! and how clever the machinery that is available to move buildings.

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  3. Oh my goodness, you are building my dream. A room, full of bookshelves with just a lamp, a chair and a table. I cant wait to see what you do to it.

    Being English I am tickled by the idea of moving a barn around. and taking it for a jaunt down a road. It just doesnt happen here! It looked cool!

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    1. I envision an oriental rug or three on the floor, tons of books, a coffee center, swinging chair, perhaps a sunken living room.

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    2. Or maybe one of those swings made out of a single bed frame and mattress and lots of pillows!

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  4. That move was the most intelligent thing I've seen in a long time. I hope it brings in some well deserved cash.

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    1. Or at least undeserved cash. Any kind of cash.

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  5. Wow that was really neat to see! I had no idea how something like that gets done.
    Donna what's your Shasta? . I have an old 1400 I'm going to start renovating this spring. There's a ton of light and it's nice to read out there.

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    1. 1978 Shasta we bought for $500 and sold for $150. Only 160 SF. Be sure to share pics on your blog when you renovate yours

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  6. Boy howdy that was some enterprise! I'm so glad you could bring that sturdy building (and history!) to TPF. Nestled under those trees, it looks to have been there from the get-go. Will you be putting in a woodburner for warmth? Imagine 288sq/ft to redoctorate, write & reflect. Yay, you go gal.

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    1. The building is well insulated and we might get away with a small electric heater for awhile. Eventually would love to build another small rocket mass stove in there as it works so well for our grain bin house.

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  7. OShaughnessy Writes now your journey really begins.. jesus mary and joseph as Dad would say.. You got this: go get em sis!!!!

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  8. Yes, the perfect guest house/retreat, I can imagine the twinkle faerie lights, hanging from the ceiling, and the window boxes filled with flowers.
    Sweet.
    Thank you for stopping by my place, I hope to visit often.
    ~ Jo

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    1. My husband wants to call it "The cabin" and I am leaning towards something more surreal like "Swansea" the home of Dylan Thomas. Either way faerie lights are definitely appealing.

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  9. What I wouldn't give to have that in my back yard for my weaving looms and a stash of yarns that's out of control! I'd put in a pellet stove.

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    1. Weaving. I so admire those with that talent. I have a friend who does amazing work here in the Central Illinois area. Ypu should check out her blog http://tandrhandweaving.blogspot.com/ Her name is Martha. Tell her Donna sent you!

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  10. What an amazing move, that could never happen here. It makes my caravan project look like a pile of scrap.

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    1. Not hardly Cro, most of this work on the old farm store, the inside electric, the insulating the plywood walls was done by my husband and sons years ago. Now I get to do the fun stuff, paint and move in furniture. YOU are building very cool memories for those GK's of yours.

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  11. That is so cool. It reminds me of when we first got the barn and shed. So exciting. Of course they are used for tools and "stuff". You've got me wanting one tucked under some trees as a guest cottage, retreat, studio. Ah, someday.

    Did you ever publish pictures of the inside when it was a store? It's a looker for sure! Can't wait to see the makeover. :-)

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    1. I did 1st man. They are on my old blog The Midlife Farmwife and you can see the store inside in it's heyday here:
      http://midlifefarmwife.blogspot.com/2014/05/south-pork-ranchan-overview.html


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  12. It's great that you were able to rescue the farm store and can now repurpose it for your retreat, Donna. Your conversion plans sound wonderful and can't wait to see its new look.

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